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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,353 (some duplicates have been removed)
privacy, to allow the growth of electronic communications without compromising the needs of law enforcement. 1986, therafted in same year that fox news was and president reagan launched a strike of khadafi. marcus unterberg was one year old. the world was a different place and we can all agree on that. governing the internet is like having a national highway policy drafted in the 19th century. the is the first of hearings that the subcommittee will have, and we will explore the needs of government, to access the contents of stohr electronic communications and the level of judicial review required to obtain them. this was a necessary response to the rapid development of wireless communication services and electronic communications in the digital era. at that time, electronic mail was -- pagers were in their infancy. to voicebeen limited communications and addressed an area of communications for which there is a fourth amendment right to privacy. extending the wiretap provisions for wireless voice communications and electronic communications such as e-mail and other computer trans
remedies that provide certain remedies for violations of those laws. some have suggested these legal protection should apply equally to drones and that they may be sufficient to alleviate any constitutional problems for any privacy concerns. in your view is this approach correct? what are the main differences between manned and unmanned aircraft as it relates to the protection of americans for their privacy concerns? >> we don't believe there are any federal statutes that would provide limits on drone surveillance in the united states. the privacy laws are very targeted to the approach the united states has taken to privacy and denting compass the surveillance drones can conduct and because of this we're actually advocating additional legislation on drone surveillance. the primary difference between and and unmanned vehicles, this has been brought up, drones are going to be able to conduct more surveillance. they are cheaper to fly, cheaper to maintain and able to conduct an incredible amount more surveillance and individuals to the surveillance and designed, built to design to carry
francisco has a substantial interest to promote in compliance with the youth sales law in protecting our children from illegally obtaining tobacco. so just the background of why this law exists. there is a lot of laws that exist, and one that i would really like to highlight is you see the old time law book here is the reason that a retailer if a clerk sells to a minor they get a ticket and it is issued a ticket and a fine that is associated with it and it is for code 308 and a violation of a law that you cannot provide tobacco to a person under 18 years of age. and this is a new law? no. you see this book, it is actually from 1906. so the code, 308 you cannot provide tobacco to a minor, and it has been on the books i think from maybe the 1880s or something, but it was in the 1906 version for your interest. there are a lot of laws that have taken effect since then that reinforce the idea that it is illegal to sell to minors. so, these slides, i cannot necessarily read, but, many members of our comment can, the reason that we put these on is that we understand that many people who work i
there are federal statutes that would provide surveillance in the united states. the privacy laws that exist are very targeted. the approach the united states has taken to privacy do not encompass the type of surveillance the drones are able to conduct. advocating forre additional legislation. the primary difference will be, and i think this has been brought up, that drones are going to be able to conduct much more surveillance. they are cheaper to fly, cheaper to buy and maintain. therefore there able to conduct an incredible amount more surveillance and suggest individuals to the surveillance. they are built and designed to carry some of the most surveillance technology on the market today. this further puts individuals at risk. >> i assume your analysis has to do with the stealth factor, the size and the way many of them are operated they do not make as much noise, harder to see, and harder to hear, and can move in and out in that -- like a seat thief infe -- like a the night. in the testimony you mentioned several concerns you have about drones. even with current advancements, and the co
's, liver, livelihood, lover or the law. those 4 things. liver, livelihood, lover and law. within those l's is when somebody shows up in my door, someone suffering, a family member suffering who brings somebody in. when it company ms to treat we know there is different types of treatment, there is evidence base treatment. there is good evidence for it, we do it. there is evidence free treatment, there is no evidence whatsoever and there is evidence proof treatment. one of those evidence proof treatment is incarceration treatment. there was an office inspection in general report and eventually matt case became supervisor for it. i have been involved in other places. treatment in custody doesn't work. flash incarceration does not work. as far as the treatment that do work for alcoholism, alcoholism is a chronic disease like diabetes. hypertension and emphysema. when we look at outcomes for chronic disease, a landmark study for the journal medical association in 1999, showed that results for treatments were no worse or better than any other chronic disease model. so treatment of alcoholism
hostess our father in law the angelica van buren is white house hostess for her father in law. law school ork review and the new york law school racial justice private hosted a series of panel discussions on civil society and the writings of dr. seuss. the popular children's book author. topics included shared interests in society. this is an hour and 25 minutes. >> good morning. >> good morning. my job here is to introduce the first panel. i would like to also welcome you all. anm delighted to be part of event that looks at the relationship between law the popular culture. there is a deep and abiding connection. we gain insights, as we will see today will move back and forth. i will introduce the members of the first panel. starting with anne mcgillivray view is a professor of law at the university of manitoba. come on up. courses include crime, law, and society. she has written a book called "black eyes all the time." she has also written "he would have made a wonderful solicitor in dracula." naomi mezey is a professor of law at georgetown university law center. she is an award winning
. schoolnew york law repute and racial justice project recently hosted panel discussions on civil society and the writings of dr. seuss. topics included shared interest in society. this is one hour and 25 minutes. >> good morning. introduce the to first panel. i would like to also welcome you all. i am delighted to be part of an event that looks at the relationship between law the popular culture. there is a deep and abiding connection. wii gain insights, as we will see today will move back and forth. i will introduce the members of the first panel. mcgillivrayh anne view is a professor of law at the university of manitoba. come on up. courses include crime, law, and society. is written a book called "black ."es all the time is also written "he would have ine a wonderful solicitor dracula." omi mezey is a professor of university lawwn center. she is an award winning feature. she is known for her interdisciplinary works on law and culture, particularly popular culture. jorge contreras is an associate professor of law at the washington college of law. he comes from a science background. he
and congress back in 1968 actually made them the law of the land, but they don't apply to 40% of the gun sales today. something like 58,000 gun dealers across this country, three times the number of mcdonald's stores, as a matter of fact, there are gun stores every place in this country, and those gun sellers -- they do background checks on all their clients. i think last year 78,000 times the government found reasons to deny people a permit to get a gun based on either they were criminals or they had mental problems. if that doesn't tell you that this is a real problem but good checks can really do something, i don't know what would. >> let me ask you about in new york the nra has filed a suit to try to defeat some of these gun control measures which are more robust than what the federal government is talking about within the states that are about magazines, about background checks and assault weapons. how do you react to that? >> well, anybody has the right to go to court and sue over anything. and in new york lots of people do that every single day. but the supreme court, which is the one t
really act as a good communicator and facilitator in the program from a law enforcement background. and the grant we get through public works really allows us to run effectively. >> great, thank you. >> [speaker not understood]. let me come on over here. what's your question? >> okay. [speaker not understood]. i've gotten three years of knowledge [speaker not understood]. my question is this. how am i going to get the police department, how am i going to get city council -- they're partially on board, but some of our people in public works are here today. how can i convey to them that i'm not a nut -- everybody here thinks i'm a nut because [speaker not understood]. how did they really take this seriously and realize that graffiti is a crime and it requires money and it requires attention from the officials, not just from covering graffiti? is there an answer? can you give me some sort of -- what's a good direction? >> [speaker not understood]. >> [speaker not understood]. basically the task force, they'll put together and try to convince the citizens something is happening, then i
weapons? >> i think it may help. but law enforcement's position from day one has been to protect the families. and they have suffered enough. and to release some pictures like that may make them suffer more. and we have to talk about the families collectively. we just can't think of one, maybe, and say it's okay and we have 19 or 20 or 25 others that don't feel it's okay. i don't think that's going to work either. so i don't think we're ever going to get the full range of acceptance to releasing pictures. but i think everybody can understand, as you aptly put, the slaughter that an ar-15 can do a 6-year-old or a 7-year-old. we don't need pictures to know that. i think in our own minds, we can certainly imagine it. and that should be our driving force. >> chief fuchs, you had, i think, two children who attended sandy hook school. they no longer attend the school. they attend another newtown school, just from age point of view. for you it must have been a very, very harrowing experience again, simply because this could have been your children. >> it was. and to be honest, when i wa
summary of the laws. the ada, calif. building code, the civil rights, and our experts here will elaborate. we also have a list of certified caps at work in san francisco for you. carla johnson with the mayor's office of disability has created a really good it died of out to interview your experts to make sure you are getting the best quality product for you. been next -- the money you pay for the inspection you can take as a tax deduction. any money that if you have taken can be applied as a tax deduction. this can be done on an annual basis. next, the opportunity, and a fund -- opportunity loan fund, providing for small businesses to pay for the inspection or to make improvements needed. to do it before you receive the lawsuit. and lastly, we of the bar association and their resources. they're providing their legal service for you. this last thing i am going to share with you in terms of what we have seen in our office is that with the individuals, that does not necessarily mean an individual will follow up with a lawsuit. what we've seen in our office is the individual's will send you a
to open my stand. will the police bust me? >> there are so many laws, everybody could be caught up in it. >> the avalanche of new laws, it makes criminals just about all of us. >> every citizen arguably could be shown to have violated some regulation in these stacks, that is the danger. >> police never told knees girls why they were shut down. >> we tried to find out but the city official, they said really they shut down our lemonade stand. >> we're not aware of who made the lemonade or what the lemonade with. you are still breaking the law and we can't let you dot. >> appleton, wisconsin shut down this stand and these kids were shut down, too. >> they said you need a permit. >> and hazelwood, illinois they settled on girl scout cookies from the front yard but the city said to stop. >> i said, what? cookies, come on. >> all has to people ran afoul of laws they didn't know existed and still don't understand. >> they are ununderstandable, not only to you but people lik me, i am a lawyer and they are incomprehenble to me. >> even the police don't understand. she says the kids' lemonade stan
it but they choose to move it a block and a half up. and dpw's application of the laws is arbitrary and mr. hwang said that it is 300 feet away and how could that be, they are doing something weird. >> thank you, next speaker please. >> hi, my name is keith, and i am not affiliated with any business in the neighborhood. impart of the neighborhood in the sense that i walk and drive those blocks frequently to get from the financial district to my facility. i know that you don't make policy decisions but this is public comment but i will note that the last thing that this block needs is another coffee per vaier particularly a truck that blocks the sidewalk, and it can con gest the traffic further. i am happy to know that there are things that you could deny this application and i hope that you do, you know, pay attention to what you are going to do and hopefully at the end of the day this application will not be allowed to exist, thank you very much. >> next speaker please? >> hi, i'm gary, i'm the applicant. i have gotten no rest in 15 calls from the department of public health over the last week.
perhaps the law enforcement folks feel the cultures in the communities and see that come out in the adults. i would like to hear about how do you affect a culture and even in san francisco we have many cultures affecting what is valued, what is criticized. >> you know i think that richard touched upon this. it's a relationship of power and it's clearly going to differ from community to community; right. when i was telling you i was picked because because i didn't speak english or at all initially there were only about 5% of us that were hispanic in the school and wouldn't be the case if 95% are hispanic and english speaking as a second language, but i think the way that we can deal with the issue is we ought to first of all start with the notion of respect for others, and respect for others can work across the line. it doesn't necessarily mean -- it doesn'tly has to deal with the culture. is how we treat one another? and i think we have to be very clear in our educational process and the communication to our people and what is acceptable behavior and what is unacceptable behavior, and i
at dearborn law-enforcement association. thank you for inviting me to speak to you about the use of unmanned aircraft a small colorado community where he lives. the mesa county sheriff's office is a middle sized of a 200 people at the patrol chamber 65 deputies. this are approximately 175,000 citizens to the infiniti 3300 square-mile county. we see a wide range for petty offenses to major crime including drug trafficking and homicide. in four years with lumbar operational hours than anyone else in the country with 185 and over 40 missions. the two small battery operated aircraft systems that's a lot considering this one on the table here is a backpack size helicopter that can fly for 15 minutes and weighs two pounds. our smaller plane can fly for an hour and weighs just about eight pounds. both systems are used to carry canvas which are commercially available. in fact coming committee same camera at wal-mart. have a tissue at the brief examples of how we use this equipment. my first example occurred last may when an historic church cup higher. recruited from a camel which allowed us to show
that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competency is really a multifaceted construct from a legal perspective. it could be competency to be executed, it could be competency to commit a crime. it could be competency to contribute to the decision as to whether voluntarily commit yourself to a mental hospital. it could be competency to participate in an abortion decision. so competency means many different things. the first thing you have to do as a scientist is ask the question, well, what does the law mean by it because if you want me to measure it, i have to somehow apply it. so going back to the question of free will, because a scientist can't operationally define it, they can't measure it, they're not really that much use to legal debates about free will. now, what does it mean on the legal side? i actually think the idea of free will or what is often referred to as volitional control plays a very big part in legal systems, but i think in the legal systems, we don't
into law. we will be taking that up with the "a-team." angela mcglowan, james toronto and doug schoen. our first guest is here to evaluate obama's middle east tour. today's focus on the enormous price on jordan as a result of the syrian civil war. joining me now is judith miller and quivered clifford may. it is a very big positive impression with this to her, if not a concrete result. >> it was an extraordinary tour. the israelis called it a thermo nuclear charm offensive. talk about a restart in a relationship that was crying out. basically the president figured out do you attract more bees with honey in a country like israel who did everything he had to do to put a relationship on course. lou: wasn't he inconsistent to be talking about peace in the middle east? at the same time that he was threatening bashar al-assad and a wrong? >> yes, but they are both provocative. they are both belligerent. they are destabilizing forces and have been for years. he understands that the israelis are reliable allies, valuable allies in many ways. they are in a difficult neighborhood. the israelis, two y
. angelica van buren is the white house hostess for her father-in- law, president martin van buren, who was a widower. we will include your comments and questions tonight live at 9 eastern on c-span and c-span3. also on c-span radio and c- span.org. >> former defense department on ail jeh johnson targeted killings overseas. administration faces questions over that legal rationale of that operation. this is just under an hour. >> good morning. it is a pleasure to welcome you here today to new york's never ending winter. glad to see you could get up so early and break your way here. we are very excited about today's conference. first, i want to give a few banks. , directorthank susan of the center on national security here at fordham for her work in putting together this conference with me. it is god'sine work, so we have done that as well as everything else. today we are looking at 21st century warfare law, the enemy, and the battlefield. andthe work of the center fort the other national security center law school, basically this is what we have been looking at for 12 years. legale been
neil/lehrer productions >> ifill: supreme court justices weighed a challenge to an arizona law requiring proof of citizenship for voter registration. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we talk to marcia coyle about today's court arguments, and ask about the broader implications for other immigration laws. >> ifill: then we turn to the banking crisis in cyprus, as european union leaders called for a tax on savings accounts, prompting a drop in global stocks. >. it's outright theft. >> woodruff: jeffrey brown kicks off a week of stories about the middle east, starting with israel's new governing coalition sworn into office today. >> ifill: paul solman reports on older workers in academic institutions, professors in the classroom long past age 65. >> am i keeping track of jobs? yes. that's okay. as long as i'm a good teacher, that's what's important. >> woodruff: and we examine the republican national committee's call for a new direction for the g.o.p., a road map hoping for a rebound in 2016 and beyond. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight
. speaker. mr. speaker, i rise in support of yucca mountain which by law is designated as the site for permanent geological repository for our nation's spent nuclear fuel. last year the president's blue ribbon commission on america's nuclear future issued a report but barred from even evaluating the merits of yucca mountain, despite the fact that it has been approved in a bipartisan basis by congress and signed into law by the president -- actually reaffirmed by signing of the law in 2002, the initial law was passed in 1982, and the law was amended in 1987 which in a bipartisan manner passed thue both chambers, signed by -- through both chambers, signed by different presidents, established that yucca mountain would be the repository for our nuclear spent fuel. what the blue ribbon commission did say was any host community should expect incentives. that commitment is no different from nevada when it comes to yucca mountain, and good news. the local county is consenting and ready to negotiate with the department of energy. in advance of yucca mountain even receiving its first deliver
with that giant gavel to pass this law she said we'd have to find the details once it was approved. three years later we found out. we're getting slammed. >> welcome everybody. i'm cavuto? how you neil because when nance sis i blowing out the candles today -- >> below wellness, prevention, no denial for preexisting conditions no lifetime limits on care. >> neil: what will be a pretty tough law. after you blow out the candles you're the one who is going to get burned, especially when you go into the not so pretty little surprises emerging. she has had this from the very beginning. the only person in the country who has read and it understands it. >> i read so it you don't have to neil. >> actually i did read it, but you actually understood it. but here's what you were telling me then and what we were fearing there the goodies were loaded up front. coverage for preexisting conditions, getting your kids on the policy longer, free. >> noaa. >> neil: and the glad stuff -- >> after the 2012 election. now the president said if you like your doctor, you can keep your doctor. you won't be able to find y
pitted a national law against a 2004 arizona voter registration bill. the case explores the extent of state powers against the controversial backdrop of voting restrictions. arizona's proposition 200 requires state residents to provide either a driver's license, passport, birth certificate or physical proof of citizenship before they can vote. but an existing federal law requires only a sworn statement of citizenship on a voter registration form. supporters say the arizona measure cuts down on voter fraud by keeping noncitizens from voting. but opponents argue the law unfairly tarring hes minorities, immigrants, and the elderly. the case is only the most recent dispute between arizona and the federal government related to immigration issues. over the summer, the supreme court upheld part of a top state law that allowed police to check for immigration papers. other states, including alabama, georgia, kansas and tennessee, have similar laws on the books and a number of other states are also considering comparable measures. the obama administration supports the challenge to the arizon
, because of dishonor. i'm asking the holy spirit to teach me the law of honor. i've always been taught to be polite and to be gracious. you can have behavior... from a heart that has no honor. you can learn how to say nicey words to people and still not have a heart of honor. honor protects. honor corrects. honor submits. honor yields. honor is willing to listen. honor. your reaction to an instruction from your boss reveals your understanding of honor. something as simple as opening the car door for a lady reveals your code of honor. something as small as taking care of your elderly mother... is the proof of honor. i can create through honor what i cannot create with knowledge and intelligence. and what i lack in experience and what i don't have financially i can create through the code of honor. honor is a seed that will outlast my lifetime. if no one taught you how to honor someone because of their achievements, and there're seven reactions that reveal honor. your reaction to greatness. your reaction to the weakness of another. your reaction to pain. i wanna know your code of honor.
it personally, and as a matter of policy and law. embedded in a broader effort to advance equality and opportunity for lgbt americans and all americans. to deny the opportunity to any of our daughters and sons, solely on the basis of who they are, and who they love is to deny them the chance to live up to their own god-given potential. >> one of the things that she said in this video that gay rights are human rights and human rights are gay rights, which is an echo of her famous declaration at the international women's conference in beijing back in '95. where she really stirred the fires in international diplomacy as first lady by declaring women's rights human rights. >> and that was controversial back then. that was seen as a sort of revolutionary statement, the state department was nervous that she said that. they didn't really want that to happen. i think we will be looking back ten, 20 years on the notion that gay rights are human rights and think, well, duh, the same way we think about women's rights now. >> a real generational change certainly in the republican party as we w
have no budget from the president, in violation of the law. he gets his ncaa bracket in on time but still no budget. this is the fourth time in five years. he set a new record this year, two months with no plan, while we had trillion-dollar deficits and a debt crisis on the horizon. his party leaders, unfortunately, failing offering a serious account of our challenge. no serious plan to grow our economy or create jobs. no plan to ever balance the budget. take more. trillions of dollars more to spend more in washington. that's what got us in this mess in the first place. so what can be done? the good news is that we now have a vehicle for regular order. the democrats derailed the budget process each of the last few years and stopped governing when they stopped budgeting. at least we now have a budget process that's moving. we brought them back in the game this spring. that's a good thing. so what's going to happen in the weeks ahead? well, we will make the case for our priorities. whether the gentleman from maryland wants to acknowledge it or not, we have divided government. the
cases against that school discipline, but holly has come up with a really wonderful solution within law enforcement that we would love you to talk about and it's preventive and solution. >> thank you. it's not going to be a shock to you that i don't have a sizzle reel but i did manage to get a few powerpoint slides in so it's a good thing if i can get my next one. can you advance it for me please? so it is a safety course that i created with yahoo. we partnered together. i started asking questions the first day so my boots are on the ground and i'm in the schools and i love doing what i do, and i believe wholeheartedly and i believe it was the soft power -- yes, i love it. i think it's effective in so many ways, so i had luckily teamed up with the right people at yahoo who were really amazing and just the foresight they saw, and believed in the concept that law enforcement needs to be a piece of this puzzle and have some solutions. we have a unique part in the schools and with kids and this did get certified for the peace officer standards and we get credit for that being police
proper and this project will be built in accordance with the law that will be scrutinized as it has been for six years now. it will meet the stand standards of the code and mr. santos is here to talk about issues but you have three minutes and come up. >> in terms of the engineering issues but this will be a better, safer situation once this project is built. >> commissioners, santos, (inaudible) for the project. stability of the site, we are proposing absolutely the best thing that can happen to this hill. why? one, we are going to take all of the water and create a permanent new watering system, so all of the drainage issues that are occurring on the adjacent properties have been solved by the fact that we are taking that excavation. two, we will have retaining walls that are properly designed and properly reinforced and more importantly they will be peer reviewed and we will have another pair of eyes and structural engineers and source engineer and geologists this is the best possible thing that could happen to the hill and stabilized and let's talk about the demolition. mr. will
'm going home and there is people all the time up in there educating myself about the law, i know is fast to get in there, but when the wheels are turned to come home, it's slow. i couldn't accept it. people are like they are going to do this to time. i said no, this is clear. this was what was supposed to have been done from the beginning. even my families, my loved wupz ones that lost. that made me fight more. i never gate gave up my fate. my hope is restored. >> with that i would like to thank all of our panelist. thank you. [ applause ] and we are now going to move to our second panel. while they take their seats, this idea of forced treatment versus constitutional rights has always been a tension that we've had in our criminal justice system. there is an issue that came up earlier this year that you may have read about involving this implementation of a court that was supposed to treat individuals who were suffering from long-term alcoholism. and the court was set up in a way where individuals were not being arrested for a crime but instead were being jailed for contempt of court a
benefits as couples. in fact, bill clinton who signed doma into law when he was president, is now asking the u.s. supreme court to overturn it. let's bring in cnn legal contributor powell cowen. how much will the reversal potentially make? >> supreme court justices would tell you they're immune from politicians lobbying them. they're appointed for life by the president, and the founding fathers frankly set up the system so you would have sort of an independent judiciary. i don't think bill clinton's position will have a major impact on the court. >> so what the constitutional argument that will be made to keep doma in place? >> well, there are two cases before the court this week. one on tuesday and one on wednesday. the first on tuesday is called the prop 8 case. california case, and it's very interesting because the california supreme court said gay marriage is legal. they said it's against the california constitution to ban it. and then lawyers came in and voters went out and they adopted prop 8, which amended the california constitution to make it illegal. so they stuck it to the jud
. >> this is highly political. lex i am not disagreeing. neither of these have a chance of becoming law. at are you a your colleagues not more time finding a middle ground instead of going through show but? -- showboat's? >> they want to get paid. that is number one. where finally a budget you can offer amendments and highlight things that need to be changed in the federal government is an important exercise. , 76example, last night senators voted to eliminate the medical device tax. if you put that in the budget, if it is allowed to come up, it will go through the senate and through the house. ands counterproductive counter prudence in terms of supplying equipment to people whether it be a diabetic or a heart patient. reason why other it's good. i do not doubt that we should spend time -- there are a lot of talks that are being discussed about reaching -- reaching a grand bargaining. you've reached the president with his sleeves rolled up, working with senators of the other party and representatives and they will come to the consensus. wea note for our viewers, were talking about this on friday as
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,353 (some duplicates have been removed)

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